NOW AVAILABLE! Ecotherapy: An Introduction ONLINE COURSE

This self-guided online course is good for 10 hours of online home study continuing education in ecotherapy.

  • Ecopsychology is the study of how nature impacts mental health and psychological and emotional wellbeing
  • Ecotherapy is applied ecopsychology; i.e. applying the tools and techniques of ecopsychology in a therapeutic environment

In this online study course, we will look at some of the principles of applied ecotherapy, as well as some of the tools and techniques. We’ll also examine recent research in the field, consider how to introduce ecotherapy into your own private practice, and learn about some of the benefits of the healing power of nature.


$29.95



DISCLAIMER
Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S is a board-approved sponsor of continuing education in South Carolina, permanent sponsor #495. This course is approved for Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists and Licensed Professional Counselors in South Carolina. The course materials are evidence-based with clearly defined objectives; however it is your responsibility to check with your local licensure board for course approval for credit prior to enrolling in this course. No warranty is expressed or implied. A list of citations and references is provided in the course materials for your records.

INSTRUCTOR CREDENTIALS
Click here to see a summary of credentials and education for Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S, CHt

INSTRUCTOR CONTACT INFORMATION
You may contact the instructor by clicking here or by mail at

Mindful Ecotherapy Center
PO Box 102
Cleveland SC 29635

COURSE OBJECTIVES
After completing this course, the student will be able to:

  • Discuss and describe the concept of Ecopsychology
  • Discuss and describe the concept of Ecotherapy
  • Differentiate between Ecopsychology and Ecotherapy
  • Discuss some of the characteristics of the Green Care model
  • Describe a rationale for the use of ecotherapy in therapeutic settings
  • Discuss the history of ecotherapy
  • Discuss the roots of ecotherapy in indigenous shamanism
  • Discuss Nature Deficit Disorder as proposed in the book, Last Child in the Woods by Louv
  • Describe and discuss some types of ecotherapy interventions
  • Describe some of the research into Nature as Nurture
  • Discuss some research in Nature and Child Development
  • Discuss the Eco-Educative Model of Ecotherapy proposed by Pedretti-Burls (2007)
  • Discuss how ecotherapy facilitates mindful states
  • Discuss some health benefits of ecotherapy
  • Discuss ecotherapy for treating addiction
  • Discuss ecotherapy for treating trauma
  • Describe and discuss some ethical issues of ecotherapy
  • Name some colleges that offer ecotherapy programs
  • Discuss some future directions for ecotherapy

COURSE FORMAT
This is a self-directed online introductory course in ecotherapy. While this course is a part of the requirements to become a certified Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Facilitator, it is also a stand-alone course that gives the student a good basic grounding in the principles and practices of ecotherapy.

The course materials include a pdf PowerPoint presentation on ecotherapy and several handouts. You may review the course materials for free by scrolling down and clicking on the links below.  The handouts also include a list of course objectives and a list of references and citations.

Click here to see a list of requirements for certification in Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy

PURCHASING THIS COURSE
When you purchase this course, you will first download the course materials by clicking on the links below. You may wish to bookmark this page so you may return to it as needed. This page contains the PowerPoint presentation and other course materials you will need to complete in order to get credit for the course. In order to get credit you will have to read the materials then pass the post-test. No partial credit is available.

When you have satisfactorily completed all of the worksheets and the post-test you will be emailed a Certificate of Completion in pdf format.

COMPLETING THE COURSE
STEP 1: Purchase the course

STEP 2: Download the PowerPoint and course materials you will need to complete to get credit for the course. Read through the PowerPoint and the supplemental worksheets.

STEP 3: The post-test for this course must also be completed with a score of 70% or higher. If you do not achieve 70% on your first time with the test, you will be given an opportunity to correct your answers.
Click here to take the post-test.

NOTE: You will not be emailed a  Certificate of Completion unless you have purchased the course.

STEP 4: Upon successful completion of the post-test, you will be issued a Certificate of Completion. This course is part of the requirements for certification in Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy, but it may also be used as stand-alone credit.

QUESTIONS
If you have any questions about this course, the materials, or how to complete the course materials, please feel free to contact me.


COURSE MATERIALS

If taking the course, please download and save the pdf files below by clicking on the links. Save to your computer so that you may refer back to it as needed. You may browse course materials for free prior to purchasing the course by clicking on the links below.

Ecotherapy – An Introduction PowerPoint

Principles and Goals of the Children and Nature Network 2008

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES WITH ECOTHERAPY AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS 2017

ECOTHERAPY – AN INTRODUCTION Course Description with Objectives and References

When you have completed the course materials, click on the link below to take the post-test.

NOTE: You will be emailed a Certificate of Completion for this course upon passing the post-test with a grade of 70% or higher. If you have not purchased the course, you will not be emailed a certificate until your purchase is completed and you have passed the post-test.

You may take the post-test as many times as necessary to pass. Your test will be graded and you will be informed by email whether or not you passed (usually within 48 hours). If you passed, your Certificate of Completion in pdf format will be attached to the notification email.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ECOTHERAPY POST-TEST

What is Ecotherapy?

For most of its existence homo sapiens has lived in harmony with nature as hunter/gatherers. Such a lifestyle requires a vast knowledge of the seasons, and of the patterns and habits of wildlife, and of plants and herbs and their healing powers. Industrialization and urbanization are fairly recent phenomena on an evolutionary scale. We still carry the genetic memory of our ancestors who lived in untamed nature. Our brains are wired for the outdoors and nature. A growing body of research demonstrates that not only do we feel better when we make time for nature, it is actually a requirement for good physical and mental health!

The field of ecopsychology studies how humans interact with nature. Ecopsychology is a philosophy combining elements of psychology and ecology. It is the philosophy that mental health is contingent upon the health of the environment. Humankind and the environment are part of an interrelated system. We are not separate from nature. We are a part of nature.

At its core, ecopsychology suggests that there is a synergistic relation between planetary and personal well-being; that the needs of the one are relevant to the needs of the other. In short, what we do to the environment, we do to ourselves. Ecotherapy is the practical application of this knowledge. In ecotherapy nature is the “therapist.” In practicing the techniques of ecotherapy, we allow the healing power of nature to work its magic on us. Hölzel et al (2011) demonstrated that meditative states of mindfulness stimulate neural growth in the cerebral cortex in the areas of the brain responsible for emotional regulation, good judgment, insight, and impulse control. Nature experiences have been demonstrated in several studies to produce meditative states (fascination, relaxation, and mindfulness).

Experiences in and with nature, or natural experiences, are ways in which we consciously choose to allow nature to work its healing magic on us. Some types of natural experiences include:

Facilitated Wilderness Experiences

In these types of experiences, a trained facilitator takes you into the woods for an adventure. These events can be anything from a wilderness experience in ecotherapy led by a therapist or counselor, to a hunting trip led by a wilderness guide. Kuo & Taylor (2004) demonstrated that therapy and other activities conducted in outdoor settings reduced symptoms of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Whittington (2006) found that wilderness skills training gave adolescent girls increased self-esteem and self-confidence and helped to shatter gender stereotypes.

Animal Assisted Therapy

Animal therapy in the form of contact with pets and/or wild or domesticated animals enhances self-actualization and can lessen symptoms of depression. Antonioli & Reveley (2005) found that simply swimming with dolphins can greatly reduce symptoms of depression. Other studies have shown that owning pets, or even just watching fish in an aquarium, can greatly reduce stress. Equine Therapy uses horses to facilitate mental and physical wellbeing. There are many other ways that animals can help us lead happier lives, as any pet owner can tell you!

Therapeutic Gardens

Sempik & Spurgeon (2006) demonstrated that therapeutic gardening reduces stress and lessens symptoms of depression. Blair (2009) discovered that gardening can be used as a means of helping school children to enhance self-sufficiency, social identity, meaning, and self-integration. There’s just something very healing about planting something and nurturing it as you watch it grow.

Vacations

Sponselee, et al (2004) discovered that outdoor activities reduce stress and restore energy. If you’ve ever had to miss a vacation, you’re probably painfully aware of the regenerative power of taking a week or so off to spend time in nature. Roggenbuck & Driver (2000) found that you don’t need a facilitator or guide to enjoy health and well-being benefits from the use of wilderness areas. There’s a reason we’re attracted to beaches and national parks!

Architecture Incorporating Natural Spaces

Nature can be incorporated into the home environment through the use of plants, an aquarium, or even recorded nature sounds. Alvarsson et al (2010) studied the positive mental health effects of listening to nature sounds.

Outdoor Classrooms

Purcell, et all in 2007 revealed that outdoor classrooms enhanced many critical factors of the educational experience, including: Enhanced retention, better focus, more attention to detail, less hyperactivity, more relaxation, increased confidence and self-esteem, and better cognitive functioning

Doing, Being, Thinking and Sensing

A key aspect of mindfulness is stepping outside of doing mode and entering into being mode.

When we’re caught up in thought and feeling cycles that lead to depression and anxiety, we usually feel that we should be doing something to fix it. The problem with this is that sometimes there is nothing you can do to fix a problem. Mindfulness is a way to escape this cycle of trying to fix things by simply focusing on our moment-to-moment experience. When we are doing this, we are in being mode. In being mode, we are not trying to fix anything. We are not trying to go anywhere. We are not trying to do anything. We are not trying, period. Trying is doing, and being mode isn’t about doing.

In being mode we are free to enjoy our experiences from moment to moment by focusing on what our senses are telling us rather than focusing on trying to find a way out of a problem. When downstairs brain is engaged, and upstairs brain is temporarily disconnected, moving into being mode allows us a little breathing room.

The way to move from doing mode to being mode is to shift our mental energy from thinking mode to sensing mode. Our brains only have a finite of energy to spend on any given task at any given time. If we have a stressful or depressing thought cycle going on, we can shift energy from what our thoughts are telling us by engaging our internal observer to start focusing on what our senses are telling us. As you read this paragraph, can you feel your breath going in and out of your lungs? Were you even aware you were breathing before you read the previous sentence? When caught up in thinking cycles, we’re focusing on the boomerang. But by shifting our attention to our direct experiences and focusing on what our senses are telling us, we’re able to move into sensing mode.

When in sensing mode we are no longer giving energy to ruminating cycles that are leading us to states that we do not want to experience. We are able to move to sensing mode by focusing first on our breathing, then on our direct experiences of the current situation. We do this by using all of our senses, in the moment, to explore the environment around us. What do we hear? What do we see? What do we smell? What do we taste? What do we feel? By asking ourselves these questions, we are able to move into sensing mode.

The more energy we spend on sensing, the less energy we have to spend on thinking. Based on the tale of two wolves, we could see the two wolves as “thinking wolf” and “sensing wolf.” The more energy you give to sensing wolf, the less energy you give to thinking wolf. The less energy thinking wolf receives, the weaker thinking wolf becomes. Conversely, the more energy sensing wolf receives, the stronger sensing wolf becomes. By shifting from thinking to sensing, you’re not trying to ‘kill’ the thinking wolf. You’re not engaging in doing by trying to make the thinking wolf go away. You’re simply depriving it of energy so that it may eventually go away on its own. Even if it doesn’t go away on its own, you’re not focusing your attention on it. Since your attention isn’t on it, thinking wolf can’t grab you by the throat, refusing to let go.

It could be said that focusing on what your senses are telling you is a type of thinking as well, and that is partially true; however, the difference is that focusing on what your senses are telling you is a type of thinking devoid of emotional content. If you’re in a thinking cycle that is causing you anxiety or depression, then anxiety and depression are emotions. But unless you hate trees for some reason, simply sitting quietly in a forest and observing a tree as if you are an artist about to draw that tree, is an exercise devoid of emotional content. By focusing on the emotionally neutral stimuli found in nature, we give ourselves the opportunity to feed the sensing wolf.

Upstairs Brain vs. Downstairs Brain

Feelings of depression, anxiety, sadness, and other emotions are generated in a part of the brain called the limbic system. This ‘downstairs’ portion of the brain is only interested in three things: Fighting, fleeing, or freezing. In ‘fight’ mode, the downstairs brain wants to protect you from harm by fighting against the threat. When it is triggered, your heart may race, your palms may get sweaty, and you may have a sharp increase in irritability and anger. In ‘flee’ mode, you may experience a similar adrenaline rush, but in this instance your brain is preparing your body to run away from the danger. In ‘freeze’ mode, we tend to retreat inside ourselves. This is the deer-in-the-headlights feeling of “If I’m very quiet and still, the bad thing won’t see me.”

Whether you’re in fight, flee, or freeze mode, your downstairs brain is preparing you to deal with a real or perceived threat in the only way it knows how. When your downstairs brain is engaged, the upstairs part of your brain tends to get overwhelmed. The upstairs brain, which consists of the neocortex of the brain, is the part responsible for thinking things through, figuring things out, and solving problems. When the downstairs brain takes over, the upstairs brain is out to lunch. That’s why when you’re emotionally overwhelmed it is nearly impossible to figure out a way to deal with it. Upstairs brain is all about finding solutions to problems, but downstairs brain is all about fighting, fleeing, or freezing. When your upstairs brain is overwhelmed, thinking things over isn’t going to work. That’s because at that point your downstairs brain is in charge. For those times when your downstairs brain is running the show, mindfulness is a way of disengaging from the thinking cycle for a while so that you can re-center yourself and reconnect with yourself and the world around you.

Scholarships Available – Earn up to 25 FREE CEUs!

If you are a mental health professional interested in earning up to 25 FREE continuing education hours in Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy here’s your opportunity!
In July and August of 2017 the Mindful Ecotherapy Center will be hosting a series of four seminars on Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy. We currently have 6 openings for volunteer assistants to help out with the seminars. Volunteers will have light duties like distributing handouts, assisting with activities, and otherwise assisting the facilitator. All volunteers receive free continuing education credit for any seminars in which they assist, as well as a free copy of the Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Workbook.

Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy (MBE) is a blending of Mindfulness and Ecopsychology.
MBE is used as a framework for helping individuals and families to find deeper connections in their own lives, and to give more meaning and enjoyment to the activities of daily living. By re-integrating ourselves with nature, we are able to tap into nature’s healing power and to heal the earth as we heal ourselves.

The Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Workbook and the Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Workshop series were developed by Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S, CHt as a 12-week program to help individuals re-connect with the healing power of nature. This four-part training for Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy for mental health professionals teaches you all the basic skills you need to facilitate the 12-session Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy (MBE) workshops. It is the central component of the MBE Facilitator Training Program for certification in Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy.

SCHEDULE

Part A
Saturday, July 15 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Mindful Ecotherapy Center

Part B
Saturday, July 29 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Mindful Ecotherapy Center

Part C
Saturday, August 12 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Bald Rock Heritage Preserve

Part D
Saturday, August 26 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Bald Rock Heritage Preserve

Bald Rock Heritage Preserve

The first two of the four sessions in this training (Part A and Part B) will be held in the Mindful Ecotherapy Center at 12 Pelham Road, Suite B, Greenville SC for classroom instruction. The second two sessions (Part C and Part D) will be held at the Bald Rock Heritage Preserve near Caesar’s Head State Park in upstate South Carolina. The course will be taught on four Saturdays in July and August. Each of these four sessions is a stand-alone CEU opportunity offering 6.25 hours of continuing education for a total of 25 hours of education. Certificates of completion good for 6.25 hours will be awarded at each session. You do not have to attend all four seminars in order to get credit for any of the seminars.

Click here for details about the seminars

REQUIREMENTS AND QUALIFICATIONS
Volunteers will be required to work a maximum of 2 hours per seminar. Most of the volunteer duties involve setting up and tearing down after each seminar, including carrying supplies and equipment to and from the site. No heavy lifting is involved.

Each volunteer scholarship recipient receives a Certificate of Completion good for 6.25 hours of continuing education credit for each seminar in which they assist. There are four seminars in the series. If you volunteer to assist at all four you will receive credit for 25 hours of continuing education. Please specify in your scholarship application how many seminars you wish to attend.

To apply for a scholarship, please complete the application below

What is Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy (MBE)?

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”

– Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Do you enjoy nature? Have you ever been camping, hiking or canoeing? Do you enjoy hunting and fishing? If so, you are probably already aware of nature’s power to relax and heal. A large and growing body of research demonstrates that nature is good for the mind as well as the body.

Mindfulness is a way of paying attention to the moment in which you find yourself by focusing on your immediate experience rather than on ruminations that may be producing stress depression, or anxiety. The benefits of mindfulness as a tool for stress reduction and self-improvement have been thoroughly researched. Mindfulness works so well in this capacity that it has been referred to as the “penicillin of mental health.”

Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy (MBE) is a blending of Mindfulness and Ecopsychology. MBE uses nature to facilitate mindful awareness, the first skill of MBE.

MBE is used as a framework for helping individuals and families to find deeper connections in their own lives, and to give more meaning and enjoyment to the activities of daily living. By re-integrating ourselves with nature, we are able to tap into nature’s healing power and to heal the earth as we heal ourselves.

Think about the last time you were stressed out or depressed about something. Hold that thought in your mind and ask yourself, “Was the stress due to something that happened in the past? Was it about something that may or may not happen in the future? How much of what I was anxious about has to do with right now, at this very moment, as I read this sentence?”

Mindfulness is a way of paying attention to what is happening right now, in this moment.

By focusing on our experiences in the now, from moment to moment, we come to realize that we are free to choose which thoughts and feelings to pay attention to, and which thoughts and feelings not to focus on. This doesn’t mean that we’re trying to stop thinking or feeling. It means that we’re just making a conscious choice on how much attention to focus on those thoughts or feelings.

The past only exists in our memories. The future is only a projection of the past. Anxiety about future events is the result of playing the odds based on past experiences and expecting similar occurrences to happen in the future. Mindfulness is a way of using the present moment to choose what to believe about the past and the future. We can choose which memories to pay attention to, and which projections about the future to focus our attention on. Mindfulness isn’t about trying to make anxious or depressing thoughts and feelings go away. It is about choosing whether or not to dwell on such thoughts and feelings.

Try this: Imagine that everything that has ever stressed you out or depressed you is written on a sheet of paper. Now imagine holding this sheet of paper about six inches from your nose, or as close to your face as you can while still being able to read the words on this page.

With the page this close to your face, how much of your surroundings can you see? If you’re like most people, you probably can’t see much of anything in the immediate environment. If your stressful thoughts and feelings were written on this page, they’d be in the way. They’d be blocking your view. When we let our stressful thoughts and feelings occupy all of our attention, then like this page, they tend to block our view of anything else that might be going on in our lives.

Now instead of having all your stressful and depressing thoughts written on this page, imagine that they’re written on a boomerang. If you tried to throw that boomerang away, it would eventually come back to you. If you weren’t careful, it might actually smack you in the head on its return trip!  The harder you try to throw this boomerang away, the faster it comes back to you. When we try to “throw away” stressful and depressing thoughts and feelings, they tend to come right back at us as well. That’s because, like it or not, stressful and depressing thoughts and feelings are just as much a part of us as happy thoughts and feelings. Trying to throw them away is trying to throw away a part of ourselves.

What if, instead of trying to throw that boomerang away, you simply set it in your lap? If you did this, those negative thoughts and feelings written on the boomerang would still be with you, but they wouldn’t be blocking your view. You could still see and interact with the world, but you also wouldn’t be trying to throw away a part of yourself.

Mindfulness is a way of setting that boomerang of stressful and depressing thoughts in your lap so you can see the world around you. It’s not a way of trying to throw those thoughts and feelings away. Remember, if you try to do that, the boomerang may come back with a vengeance! Instead, mindfulness is about learning to accept that such thoughts and feelings are a natural part of existence, and accepting that we don’t have to let them keep us from interacting with the world unless we consciously choose to do so.

Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy in Clinical Practice LIVE Seminars

25-hour continuing education seminar
Starting July 15, 2017

Do you enjoy nature? Have you ever been camping, hiking or canoeing? Do you enjoy hunting and fishing? If so, you are probably already aware of nature’s power to relax and heal. A large and growing body of research demonstrates that nature is good for the mind as well as the body. Ecopsychology is the study of nature’s ability to heal. Ecotherapy is the application of ecopsychology in a therapeutic setting.
Mindfulness is a way of paying attention to the moment in which you find yourself by focusing on your immediate experience, rather than on ruminations that may be producing stress depression, or anxiety. The benefits of mindfulness as a tool for stress reduction and self-improvement have been thoroughly researched. Mindfulness works so well in this capacity that it has been referred to as the “penicillin of mental health.”
Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy (MBE) is a blending of Mindfulness and Ecopsychology.
MBE is used as a framework for helping individuals and families to find deeper connections in their own lives, and to give more meaning and enjoyment to the activities of daily living. By re-integrating ourselves with nature, we are able to tap into nature’s healing power and to heal the earth as we heal ourselves.

The Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Workbook and the Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Workshop series were developed by Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S, CHt as a 12-week program to help individuals re-connect with the healing power of nature. This four-part training for Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy for mental health professionals teaches you all the basic skills you need to facilitate the 12-session Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy (MBE) workshops. It is the central component of the MBE Facilitator Training Program for certification in Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy.

Each of the four sessions in this training begins in the Mindful Ecotherapy Center at 12 Pelham Road, Suite B, Greenville SC for classroom instruction. After a break for lunch, each session will then resume on one of the hiking trails at or near Table Rock State Park in Pickens County north of Greenville. The course will be taught on four Saturdays in July and August. Each of these four sessions is a stand-alone CEU opportunity offering 6.25 hours of continuing education for a total of 25 hours of education. Certificates of completion good for 6.25 hours will be awarded at each session.

SAVE BY REGISTERING FOR ALL FOUR SEMINARS IN ADVANCE!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR ALL FOUR SEMINARS AT ONCE FOR $200
A savings of over $40 when you register for all four seminars in advance (no refunds if you cannot make the seminars except in case of extreme emergency)

Session schedule is as follows:

Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy in Clinical Practice Part A

Saturday, July 15, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Topics covered:
Mindful Awareness
Radical Acceptance
Wise Mind and Wise Body

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR PART A

Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy in Clinical Practice Part B

Saturday, July 29, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Topics covered:
Letting Go
Living in the Now
Centering

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR PART B

Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy in Clinical Practice Part C

Saturday, August 12, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Topics covered:
Connecting
Nature as Metaphor
Nature as Teacher

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR PART C

Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy in Clinical Practice Part D

Saturday, August 26, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Topics covered:
Nature as Nurture
Nature as Healer
Living in True Self

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR PART D

HOW TO DRESS:
Dress casually for hiking trails. Comfortable dress and sturdy boots and/or walking shoes. You may also wish to bring sunscreen, insect repellent, hats, and water bottles. We will meet at the office for the first part of the day, then move to a hiking trail for the remainder of each training, so dress appropriately.

WHAT TO BRING:
Sunscreen, insect repellent, notebook, pens or pencils, water bottles, snacks (like trail mix, etc.) and a portable chair or blanket for sitting.

RECOMMENDED TEXT:
The Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Workbook
or
The Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Facilitator Manual
(The text of the workbook is contained within the facilitator manual, so there is no need to purchase both books. If you intend to pursue certification as a facilitator, you may wish to purchase the facilitator manual, which contains tips and instructions on how to run a successful group).

SCHOLARSHIPS
There are 12 scholarships available for interested participants. If you are awarded a scholarship you get free tuition for any of the four seminars you assist in, plus a free copy of the Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Workbook. Scholarship recipients will be assigned light duties assisting the instructor during each workshop. Scholarship recipients also receive free continuing education credit for each session attended.

The Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy in Clinical Practice series is a requirement for certification in MBE. The full list of requirements for certifications is as follows:

The MBE Facilitator Training Program is a 50-hour program that includes the following courses:
Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy in Clinical Practice – 25 hours (Parts A-D)
Mindfulness: An Introduction – 10 hours
Ecotherapy: An Introduction – 10 hours
Group Dynamics and Facilitation – 5 hours

Click here if you are interested in learning more about certification as a Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Facilitator

Click on the links below to register for the Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy in Clinical Practice series.

 

Mindfulness: An Introduction 10-hour Home Study CEU Course

$49.95

This self-guided online course is good for 10 hours of online continuing education in Mindfulness.

“Mindfulness is the energy of being aware and awake to the present moment. It is the continuous practice of touching life deeply in every moment of daily life. To be mindful is to be truly alive and present with those around you and with what you are doing. We bring our body and mind into harmony while we wash the dishes, drive the car or take our morning cup of tea.”
–Thich Nhat Hanh, Zen Buddhist Monk and Founder of the An Quang Buddhist Institute

Think about the things that have caused you anxiety, stress or depression in the past. Now ask yourself, “Was it the things themselves that caused the anxiety, stress and depression, or was it what I believed about those things?”
If it is true that anxiety and depression are rooted in our thoughts, then we should be able to change our thoughts and eliminate, or at least minimize, anxiety and depression. Mindfulness is a way to change your thoughts and feelings. If you can change your thoughts and feelings, you can change your world!

Product Description

DISCLAIMER
Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S is a board-approved sponsor of continuing education in South Carolina, permanent sponsor #495. This course is approved for Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists and Licensed Professional Counselors in South Carolina. The course materials are evidence-based with clearly defined objectives; however it is your responsibility to check with your local licensure board for course approval for credit prior to enrolling in this course. No warranty is expressed or implied. A list of citations and references is provided in the course materials for your records.

INSTRUCTOR CREDENTIALS
Click here to see a summary of credentials and education for Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S

INSTRUCTOR CONTACT INFORMATION
You may contact the instructor by clicking here or by mail at

Mindful Ecotherapy Center
PO Box 102
Cleveland SC 29635

COURSE OBJECTIVES
After completing this course, the student will be able to:
 Discuss and describe the concept of Mindfulness
 Differentiate between Doing Mode and Being Mode
 Discuss Differentiation and how it relates to Mindfulness
 Discuss Individuation and how it relates to Mindfulness
 Discuss emotional regulation and how it relates to Mindfulness
 Discuss and describe Emotional Mind, Rational Mind, and Wise Mind
 Discuss the process of Externalization and how it relates to Mindfulness
 Discuss and describe Positive and Negative Thought Streams
 Describe and discuss the Mindful Skill of Observing
 Describe and discuss the Mindful Skill of Describing
 Describe and discuss the Mindful Skill of Fully Participating
 Describe and discuss the Mindful Skill of Being Non-Judgmental
 Describe and discuss the Mindful Skill of Focusing on One Thing at a Time
 Describe and discuss the Mindful Skill of the Power of Intention
 Describe and discuss the dialectic of Acceptance vs. Change
 Describe and discuss Mindful Acceptance
 Describe and discuss Letting Go
 Be able to conduct a basic Mindful Meditation
 Discuss how Mindfulness may be used with CBT
 Discuss several Mindfulness-Based forms of therapy


COURSE FORMAT

This is a self-directed online introductory course in mindfulness. While this course is a part of the requirements to become a certified Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy Facilitator, it is also a stand-alone course that gives the student a good basic grounding in the principles and practices of mindfulness.

The course materials include a 114 page workbook on mindfulness in pdf format, several mindful meditations in mp3 format, and over a dozen worksheets that you may use in your own practice. The workbook also includes a list of course objectives and a list of references and citations.

Click here to see a list of requirements for certification in Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy

PURCHASING THIS COURSE
When you purchase this course, you will be taken to a download link that will allow you to download the course materials. You may wish to bookmark this page so you may return to it as needed. This page contains the workbook and other course materials you will need to complete and return in order to get credit for the course. In order to get credit you will have to complete the entire workbook. No partial credit is available.

When you have satisfactorily completed and returned all of the worksheets in the workbook you will be emailed a Certificate of Completion in pdf format.

 

COMPLETING THE COURSE
STEP 1: Purchase the course
STEP 2: Upon completion of your transaction you will be taken to a download page that allows you to download the workbook and course materials you will need to complete to get credit for the course. The worksheets are included in the workbook. You must complete them, then scan them in and return them to chuck@mindfulecotherapy.org or fax to 888-525-5318 to obtain course credit. Read through the workbook and do the experiential exercises described in each session, then complete the worksheets.
STEP 3: There are two meditations in mp3 format that are included with the course. You should listen to each of these meditations at least once, as there are worksheets that ask you to record your responses to each guided meditation. To take this course you will need to have an mp3 player or some other method of listening to audio files in mp3 format. If you would like to download these meditations for use in your private practice, right-click on the link for each meditation and select “Save As,” then download to your computer or other device. You may use these for free as long as you do not re-sell them or alter them in any way.
STEP 4: You may send in the worksheets as they are completed, or you may send them all together in one package. You may send them as email or fax them to 888-525-5318 attn: Charlton Hall or email them as pdf attachments to chuck@mindfulecotherapy.org
STEP 5: Upon successful completion of all the activities in the workbook and submission of all worksheets, you will be issued a Certificate of Completion good for 10 home study credit hours of continuing education in mindfulness. This course is part of the requirements for certification in Mindfulness-Based Ecotherapy, but it may also be used as stand-alone credit.
OPTIONAL: Register and create a free online account on our Mindful Ecotherapy Center Bulletin Board for free online support from the instructor and fellow students.

QUESTIONS
If you have any questions about this course, the materials, or how to complete the course materials, please feel free to contact me.

Play Therapy Supervision

If you would like to make an appointment, please click here

Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S is a Clinical Member of the Association for Play Therapy (APT) (Member # 32963853) and a Registered Play Therapy Supervisor (RPT-S # S1947). Charlton offers Play Therapy at his office in Greenville, South Carolina and online for those who do not live in the Upstate South Carolina area.

Click here to learn more about Play Therapy

Play Therapy supervision is regulated by the guidelines of the Association for Play Therapy. Click here to learn more about the requirements to become a Registered Play Therapist (RPT) or a Registered Play Therapy Supervisor (RPT-S).

The Association for Play Therapy (APT) offers three credentials by which licensed mental health professionals and school counselors/psychologists might demonstrate and promote their specialized play therapy knowledge and training.

  • Registered Play Therapist (RPT)
  • Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor (RPT-S)
  • School Based-Registered Play Therapist (SB-RPT)

Registrants are required to annually renew their credential.  In addition to annual renewal, registrants submit play therapy continuing education every three years.  Please visit the Credential Renewal section of our website for more information.

For questions concerning the Credentialing Program, contact APT 559-298-3400.

Alexandra Jarrell, Continuing Education & Credentialing Coordinator, ajarrell@a4pt.org
Claudia Vega, PhD, Clinical Coordinator, cvega@a4pt.org

3 FREE Continuing Education Hours for Mental Health Professionals

Join the Mindful Ecotherapy Center and Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S for this FREE 3-hour continuing education course for mental health professionals. Since this course is provided free of charge, pre-registration is required and is limited to the first 20 participants.

Charlton Hall, LMFT/S, RPT-S is a SC board-approved sponsor of continuing education for LPCs and LMFTs, permanent sponsor # 495

Trauma and the Brain
FREE 3-hour continuing education course for mental health professionals
Saturday, June 3, 2017
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Meet-and-greet starts at 9 a.m.
Greenville Library Main Branch (Hughes Library)
25 Heritage Green Place
Greenville SC 29601

For more information, call (864) 384-2388 or contact the Mindful Ecotherapy Center.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Trauma actually changes the physical structure of the brain. The earlier the trauma, the more potentially long-lasting and permanent the damage. In this course we’ll look at what some of the most recent research in neurobiology has to say about how trauma impacts the brain. We’ll also look at some treatment options that might help to minimize or even reverse the damage.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
Describe some physical changes in the brain caused by trauma
Discuss how the cerebral cortex and the limbic system process a trauma reaction
Discuss the fight or flight cycle and how it impacts brain function
Discuss some causes of childhood trauma
Discuss how trauma impacts the brain at various stages of child development
Discuss and implement some mindfulness-based treatments for trauma

COURSE INSTRUCTOR
Click here for instructor’s qualifications and credentials

DIRECTIONS

REGISTRATION
To register for this course, complete the contact information below

Healing with Nature in Mind